Perry the Bull unveiled as Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games mascot

The Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games has unveiled its mascot – Perry, a bull adorned with a patchwork of multi-coloured hexagons.

Perry is inspired by the design of ten-year-old Emma Lou, the winner of a national design competition that took place over the summer of 2020. The competition tasked children aged 5-15 with creating a mascot that reflects the identity, heritage and culture of Birmingham and the West Midlands.

The winning design was combined with the findings of the first ever Virtual Mascot Summit in July 2020. The summit saw more than 50 children from across Birmingham and the West Midlands take part in tasks to develop the mascot’s characteristics, values, and movements, helping to inspire Perry’s personality.

Perry becomes an icon for the Birmingham 2022 Commonwealth Games, the biggest sports event to be held in the UK for a decade and will be seen by a global audience of more than one billion people.

Perry will visit schools, community groups and events when restrictions allow, and local groups can already register their interest on the mascot page. There will also be educational packs for schools in the weeks ahead.

Learn more about Perry

Perry is named after the Perry Barr area of Birmingham, the home of the Alexander Stadium, which will host the athletics events at the Games, as well as the opening and closing ceremonies. The stadium is undergoing a £72 million transformation in time for the Games.

The mascot’s rainbow coloured hexagons represent the coming together of the Commonwealth in equal partnership with the diverse communities of Birmingham and the West Midlands at the Games in 2022.

Perry is a friendly, kind, and cheeky bull, an animal with which Birmingham has been synonymous for centuries. The city has had a market area known as the Bull Ring since the 16th century; the site is close to the current Bullring shopping centre, with an iconic bronze bull statue at its entrance.

Perry is wearing a medal, which references Birmingham’s iconic Jewellery Quarter, the UK’s centre for jewellery and precious metals for more than two hundred years. The area still produces around 40% of the country’s jewellery and is home to one of the world’s largest Assay Offices, hallmarking millions of gold, silver, and platinum items each year.

The mascot’s sports kit includes blue, red, and yellow stripes, a nod to the colours of the official flag of Birmingham, and the city’s motto, Forward.